About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
FBC 27
CNBC 26
CSPAN2 23
CSPAN 13
CNNW 6
LINKTV 5
MSNBCW 5
KCSM (PBS) 4
KQED (PBS) 4
KPIX (CBS) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
CNN 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 142
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 149 (some duplicates have been removed)
in europe are trading lower as ben bernanke warns monetary policy may not be enough to offset the damage if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the fed takes the new and surprising step in its ongoing efforts to boost the economy, tying interest rates directly to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors cheering the plan to save danone's plans to offset losses over the next two years. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> welcome to the program. coming up on today's show, we'll be plenty busy. we head out to tokyo where carry enjoji has been talking about the upcoming elections. then, we hone in on central london where one pilot project is living roof and major buildings. find out what green living can do go r to improve the area. >>> and today, the 1 billionth international tourist will reportedly arrive at a destination in the world. at 11:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and c
to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into where we are with this global market. more now on the global trading day in europe. 5-4 advances just about outpace decliners on the dow jones stoxx 600. most european stocks were up yesterday. the dax up 13 points. the dax, second highest close of the year, still up 27.5% for the year. right now, the ftse sound, the cac kron, closed at a fresh 52-week high. and the ftse is up 13 points despite falls from italian banks. let's show you where we are as far as the bond yields are concerned. we just check in. italian yields, 4.4% on the year. we'll show you the twos and tens, as well. i'll give you more on how that compares to where we closed yesterday. so the two-year, that's the low where we were yesterday. 10-year spanish yields, 5.581%. two-year yield, 2.35%, kind of where we were yesterday, too. and they're continue to go appreciateslide slightly from yesterday's close. as far as currency markets, 1.2880 was the two-week low on
's take a look at how markets are trading. stoxx europe 600 is down about .6% this morning, this after word that house speaker john boehner's plan b didn't come to a vote last night. he couldn't get them in place apparently. we'll have plenty more on the impact of that on the program. not much here, we see decliners well outpacing advancers. the ftse mib in italy down .6%. the ibex down .4%. the dax selling off .5% lower than yesterday. same goes for the ft. if it is, down .8%. 5909. how quickly we've gone from talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so
weighing on investor sentiment today. in europe, it was the last trading day of the year, and what a year it has been. our correspondent has kept an eye on the trading floor all year for us. he sent us this report from the floor of the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the year has ended a very successful 2012, also for the frankfurt exchange, which is why you see tables and chairs where there usually are not. there will be a celebration here shortly, and there is something to celebrate -- the dax performed to the tune of about 30%-plus this year, and many shares went up. only a few lag behind. the best shares almost doubled in value. when you look at the second tier, there were some that more than doubled in value. demand mostly responsible for that, according to -- the man most responsible for that according to everyone here is mario draghi. he promised the european central bank would do everything in its power to preserve the euro, and that really release energy and restored some confidence also for the bureau. in 2013, people see more share market. the dax could reach a new record highs. p
. as america stood on the edge of american leadership, europe entered a decade in which it convinced itself war was impossible. the book, grand illusion, captured the view that europeans were too advanced, too sophisticated to fight each other. john maynard keynes a code this with his famous observation about how the world was tied together, how an englishman could order from his doorstep products from faraway lands and have them delivered to him. it's kind of an early version of thomas friedman's theory which claims an advanced country that used computers won't go to war with each other. i call it the starbucks to pick any two countries that have starbucks won't fight. you know, i guess unless they have like a triple espresso to another observer, in a much different way, posited that war would be so bloody and weaponry so deadly that no one would dare risk a conflict. all of these assume that european leaders would be rational, a stretch even in the present day. this, of course, vanished in august 1914, a war sparked by one of the most unlikely of accident when ferdinand on his way back from s
regimes in eastern europe. under the iron grip, hundreds of thousands died, and many more dissidents were sent to prison camps. these days, as albania tries to show a new democratic base to the world, even hoping one day to become a member of the european union, the past is still there to haunt it. former political prisoners are fighting a bitter battle for compensation, but not even hunger strikes seem likely to convince the current government. >> we go to the site of the hunger strike. the word "democracy" is still written on the wall. strikers refused food for weeks, and then police came and took away their water and medicine. this is where one strikers set himself on fire. the man did not survive. he was recently buried. >> the hunger strike was the result of 21 years of humiliation and discrimination of former political prisoners in this country. we are walking corpses. our bodies are alive, but our spirits have died. >> all their energy goes into the fight. many are mental rex, dependent on drugs or alcohol -- many are mental wrecks. the solidarity within the group is all they have
20 years. so look, and a lot of this is down to problems, i guess, in europe, right? what is the outlook with what happens with global growth and what is happening? >> unsurprisingly, the volume of growth of trade are strongly correlated to the volume of growth. so growth slows down. trade slows down with a sort of multiple. that's the main reason. there may be other marginal reasons like, for instance, difficulties in trade finance. which is a sort of the aftermath of the financial crisis. but the reality is that the main export market of the senate, which is europe, is not doing well. the second export market is not doing that well. not to talk about japan. so this has a slowdown effect which reverb rates on the growth of emerging countries. >> and i know when you see what's happening in italy, will this, the political developments in italy that cause more instability and less reform there, are you concerned that will have a further destabilization impact? >> no. i mean, i think it comes at a time where we are starting to see an exit, a crisis exist by europe. whether th
ago here as opposed to the countries of western europe, we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been a relatively robust. when capitalism can do it's thing, it polarizes. when it polarizes it creates an awareness that is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people i'm having a hard time and a shrinking number of people are collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to the two of them that this is happening. and in the one group there may develop their resentment against the of a group. and if you have a system like capitalism coexisting cannot that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with the democratic society in which everybody has the throne and the following in sight is going to occur to a lot of people. we, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it to reverse it, to offset is to use the political system to get the result. in the political system weekend rearranged so that what we lost in the economics as it became more and
and focus on just one section about demands on the burke that in europe. quince not very long ago americans and europeans pride themselves on religious toleration and understanding. and animosity and violence including such bloody episodes as the wars of religion, including as well be quieter violence of colonial religious domination by europeans in many parts of the world and added to that, domestic anti-semitism and anti catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketp
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
't have too much vacation or little. we do it just right. europe had work like we did. you want lopping beer vacation you can have a stagnant economy like europe. we raise taxes we'll have longer vacation but fewer jobbings. >> you are right. we don't want to be like the french. and people here in the united states and government union. and i was on vacation and check my blackberry and read a rick unger e-mail while on vacation. >> you are never on vacation. >> you work it anyway. nine out of the 10 are checking their work phones. any time to rejuvenate and come back ragged. >> we need that vacation time to work better. >> when you say economy you are talking about gdp. good or ill it is major transaction. have everyone never talk a day off and work 60 hours a week. steve is protesting that. >> there is it a correlation between vacation time and increased productivity. a 2010 study show that americans felt refreshed and better about their jobs coming back it is important to take breaks throughout the work die. >> i center to tell you, i don't think i had a year where i used up all of my
>> just a few days until christmas, and europe, as elsewhere in the world, it is a time for peaceful contemplation with family or close friends. a very warm welcome to this special edition of "european journal" from belgium. christmas is a few days for rest where we find time for leisure, which has almost become a luxury good, but we will try to find it in today's show. that's why we have come to the flemish part of belgium. it is all-bishops town famous for tower bells, and when the time, it is a good opportunity to pause for a moment. >> the music of bells. the master coaxes melodia sounds from the musical instrument. high above the roofs of the town. >> for me, bell music is the connection between everyday life and spiritual life. it does not have to be religious, but there is definitely something spiritual about playing here. >> even as a child, he loved the sound of bells. the musician says it makes him dream, and for more than 30 years, he has been living that dream. >> it is a very social and communicated instrument. all the people in the town can hear it, and the
in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. like grover is stuck with this pledge he made everybody take which is that they have to go over the cliff beca
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to move into equity. i think the numbers are actually going to be relatively small. and i would certainly advocate against doing that because as you were saying, weak numbers, unless you see some much strong
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
, more green than red on the board today. by three to two, gainers outpacing losers. now, europe was closed yesterday. there was trading in the u.s. it was a weaker session. that move did extend to some parts of asia overnight. interestingly enough, the shanghai composite down .6%. the hang seng was higher on the day. the nikkei adding .9%. the kospi was up even though south korea growth projections were lowered. european markets as we look across the major bourses give you a sense of the action we're seeing in the xetra dax which is about to have its best year in seven years, something like that. the ibex 35 is rallying as we get a further sense of how little value bon can i a has. the ftse mib is moving higher, too, adding about .1%. take a quick look at the bond space, the yield for spain and italy is moving higher today. but roughly as relevance we've seen predominating over the last couple of weeks. that is around 5.3% for spain. 4.5% for italy. we did see guilds moving about 3% level. now back below 1.9%. stick around because straight ahead, we get a view from one economist
you very much. a key session in japan overnight. >>> as we pivot our focus to europe, you see stocks addi adding .3%. consistent with the rally we've seen over the last several trading sessions and apparently having plenty to do with the possible resolution of u.s. fiscal talks. we'll have more in a little bit. the survey also helping to lift sentiment or keep it buoyant. look at the major borses. green in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want
is that with 18 months of kosciuszko's death this will was contested by three different parties, in europe, one within the united states at the time, when that surface three different subsequent wills that had been drawn up in europe, and so i don't quite understand, and in jefferson -- at this point he said this is going to really fall into a lot of litigation. he said i think it's going to go past my lifetime. he was right. and so he resigned as executor, and sure enough, this litigation continued. finally, wound up in supreme court. it was resolved in 1852 in favor of the polish descendents your this is 26 years after jefferson's death. so what i'm confused about is how did he ever have that money in front of him? the money was in the u.s. treasury in washington, and he never had access to it. and after that date it was tied up in the courts. so how could he have used this money to free slaves? and how did he have that option of no, i'm going to back off of this, i don't want to free my slaves. i'm really confused as to how he ever had access to those funds. >> the will end up in litigation
see stock markets in asia and europe up a bit. i think their expectation that washington will come to an agreement, i think that might be too early. i think this is still a very clear possibility that they could allow the deadline to pass and resolve this sometime in the middle of january. >> well, any red lution would be welcome. the cost as well, but these spending cuts and the tax rises effectively, the end of the tax concession, that's automatic. >> that is automatic yes but there is question where the money can be found if you like to plug the gap. they wouldn't have much impact for a while. but ultimately they would. and the difficulty is not necessarily the fact that the deadline, this deadline, which is some extent of official anyway would be overrun. it's more the uncertainty associated with it. how can you plan if you don't know what the tax rate will be? >> here in europe, one of the banks that caused a huge flurry at the time of its impact -- >> this could be a laymen of europe. we've had the euro in crisis which was sparked by soveren debt, which then destabilized debt
. the back drop of this whole presidential year is europe. we know where the path leads. and the turmoil and welfare states and how unsustainability and the high unemployment that comes with them and that was the back drop of our presidential campaign. >> paul: okay, the voters said, yeah, we're going to keep moving in that direction, kim. i mean, how, what do you think the electorate is here, behind the choices that jason just suggested they might be? >> barack obama won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. so if you went out and you asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obamacare? most would say no, but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm still going to try to make them better and a guy he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of middle class americans and in the end, people decided
hikes, europe's grand experiment with taxing the rich more is falling apart, especially in france and britain. and here at home, california and new york are passing through the 50% tax rate barrier. is anybody looking at how tax hikes fail the test of economic growth? >>> back here in the u.s., could it be michigan which used to call itself the worker's paradise union state is now moving towards new anti-union right-to-work legislation and it looks like it's going to pass? but first up, budget talks resume between speaker john boehner and president obama today. with just 25 days to go, let's keep tabs on where we stand. reports of a conservative backlash against speaker boehner simply not true. he has the solid support of his leadership and the rank and file. but there is concern among some in the gop that they are at risk of becoming the party for rich people while president obama and democrats stake their claim on the middle class. and my tax rate flexibility with higher -- here's what the president said earlier today. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevent pr
europe. we have this area of low pressure. this frontal system giving some torrential rainfall. and improvement here but on the forward edge of this frontal system there is likely to be some snow extending down toward the alpine region. some shower weather for the u.k. and much of france, too. over eastern parts of europe seeing cloudy skies, outbreaks of rain. -14 degrees is expected in moscow. we have a fairly brisk, northwesterly wind making an impact all the way down towards sudan seeing temperatures below average at 29 degrees. as we move into central parts of africa, while the monsoon rains are pushing further, a decent amount of rain is being reported but generally you see the rainfall pushing away from the democratic republic of the," . -- of congo. >> the french president, president hollande, has addressed the parliament as it celebrates 50 years of independence. although he did not directly apologize, he did say he recognized the suffering experienced by algerians. u.n. secretary general ban ki- moon sees little hope for political dialogue and is worried about atrocit
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >> apple as we mentioned in the spotlight today, shares of the tech giant coming off their worst day in four years, sliding back into bear market territory. the one day loss erased nearly $35 billion in market cap. that chunk is bigger than 400 other s&p 500 companies. apple ceo tim cook talked to nbc's brian williams in our rock center exclusive. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, this i found, as a matter of fact, the engine in here is made in america. and not only are the engines in here made in america, but engines are made in america and are exported. the glass on this phone is made in kentucky. so we have been working for years on doing more and more in the united states, next year, we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> you can see the entire interview with tim cook tonight on rock center, that's 10:00 eastern time on your local nbc station, but for now
. >>> and corporate news weighs on sentiment across europe. kpn shares fall after dividend and greco stocks plunges as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's
. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunities. i can assure you
that is necessarily the right body to do it. it certainly does not think that all 6000 banks in europe should be involved. france on the other hand -- france and spain leading the charge, saying that this must be done now. financial markets are being very good and not panicking, but if they see continued failure of eurozone finance ministers to agree to this, we might get the restoration of finance of duties, which of costa much trouble in recent years. the deadline for agreeing is no overarching bank advisory super body is meant to be in place on january 1. it does not look likely, and a lot of frustration at this meeting today with the sides deeply divided and no sign of agreement. that, of course, is the basic issue -- why has there not an overarching supervisory control? precisely because it was difficult to do then. the eurozone crisis highlighted that failure, and we've still got the same problems blighting the regular meetings of finance ministers. >> despite the eurozone crisis, german exports are still robust. >> we will have the latest on the german export data later on in the progr
't harm the patient. right now this economy is getting weak. we've seen higher taxes have done in europe and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more
of energy to europe. >> putin was speaking in brussels, where he has been holding talks with eu leaders. his first visit after he was reelected. although russia and the you are close trading partners, there are various contentious issues which divide them. >> vladimir putin did not waste any time on arrival -- just a quick way that the cameras. outside, protesters clashed with police. the women's rights activists were not mincing words, telling the president to go to help -- go to hell. inside, the eu message to russia was also clear. >> we will discuss commitments to guarantee our citizens democratic rights. >> the biggest disagreement is over energy issues. the eu has been critical of new gas pipelines from russia. the south stream pipeline is meant to carry russian gas through bulgaria to austria and italy, but the u.s. and russia are arguing over the rules to be applied to the new pipeline. >> it is true that some difference remained regarding some aspects of energy relations between europe and russia. >> european demands for russia to separate gas companies and distribution channels hav
by the lower court. >> he admitted to manipulating more than 20 games across europe. together with a group of accomplices, he plate -- paid cash to players and officials to influence the action on a field. he put big bets on those games by bookmakers in asia. the court today confirmed that it was a clear attempt to cheat them out of money. >> the court today made a clear ruling confirming that the manipulation of sporting betts announced -- amounts to fraud. the bookmakers were in effect deceived. >> but the judges also overturned parts of the original verdict. he had already served time in jail for a previous scandal involving a referee. in his second trial, he helped the police investigation. the judges say that was not reflected in the sentence, but he cannot count on a softer sentence when the case goes back on trial. prosecutors will be trying for a longer jail term. europe's biggest betting scandal is far from over. >> let's stay with soccer. it has been a relatively easy draw for germany's key teams in the second round of the champions league. let's have a look now at the upcoming m
a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking points by the cia. she went on a defensive. and president obama left her, john, twisting slowly, slowly in the wind. she's gone. >> she'll still be our u.n. ambassador, though, pat. i give worst politician to mitt romney who never quite came across as human. and he lost. in part, because of his personality. >> she is going to stand you up, ambassador? >> yes. >> herm an cain again because a man who runs for the presidency who didn't think that his personal life would ultimately blow up presidency. >> does he have a job? >> he does. i don't know that he has -- >> he is a great -- he has a great future in talk-radio, i am sure. >> clarence, something for us? >> yes. worst politician, clint eastwood, although he is a good actor. >> this is very domestic. i will though it out on a larger scale for you. does that help you any, pat? worst p
taxes have done in europe and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more jobs, bringing down unemployment and braying down the deficit if we have 3
at what's been happening in europe, you'll see a similar story there. actually a little stronger gains. in france, the cac up by about two-thirds of 1%. in germany, the dax up by 0.4% and ftse in london is up by a quarter percent. in asia overnight, you did see the hang seng down by about 1.2%. shanghai composite down, as well, down by 1%. in consider rea, the kospi up by 0.6%. oil prices have been a little weaker. down by about seven crept cents. and ten year note yielding 1.61%. that's been stuck in a tight range for quite a while. take a look at the dollar this morning. you'll see the euro at this point is still above 1.30, 1.3029 even though the dollar down across the board. dollar-yen at 82.10. gold prices this morning are up by about $8. as the fiscal cliff approaches, we're wondering what we can expect from the markets. our guest hosts again barry knapp and richard bernstein. barry, you're concerned about the direction the talks have taken. >> yeah, it's interesting as i actually traveled through europe last week, there is all this focus on the timing of getting a deal. but ther
idea what he was saying. turner traveled throughout britain and europe. often on foot, carrying a paintbox, he sketched and painted lyrically beautiful landscapes that changed the face of british art. when he died in 1851, he was one of the wealthiest and most famous artists in britain's history. throughout his career, he was always well aware of the key to his success. (reader) "the only secret i have got is damned hard work." (narrator) turner's life and career began in london. by 1788, at the age of 14, j.m.w. turner was apprenticed to an architect as a draftsman. architectural views appeared in his works throughout his life. the next year, turner entered the royal academy of arts school at somerset house. its president, the painter joshua reynolds, endorsed the prevailing view that ranked paintings in a clearly defined hierarchy. history painting was considered the noblest because it could portray events drawn from historical incidents, literature, the bible and mythology. genre painting, scenes from daily life, came next because they also offered examples of virtue to inspi
. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three powerful special in
the economic outlook amid uncertainties in europe and china. >>> some encouraging words from france's central bank chief about the eurozone economy. he says it's gradually regaining market confidence. bank of france governor christian noyer spoke in tokyo on monday. he said concerns over europe's debt crisis have now eased somewhat. >> the ures financial situation has improved over the past few months. long-term bond yields are long-term bond yields are falling sharply in spain, for instance, and showing positive signs, among others, that point to a gradual return of confidence to the euro area. >> noyer noted borrowing costs for spain, france and other countries in the region have declined that he pointed out is due in part to a european central bank program to buy bonds of debt-ridden nations. the governor also said a stable bond market is necessary for every central bank to implement effective monetary policy. >>> most nuclear powers plants in japan are offline after last year's disaster. another energy-saving campaign is now under way to avert power shortages this winter. the government a
century, beginning of the 14th century, venice is one of the biggest cities in europe, one of the biggest and richest and that's kind of remarkable because if you've ever been there, it's such a crummy place. rd, mosquito bitten, lagoons, very hard to build are the only reason italians ended up babies because they chased them off the good land. so yours is incredibly rich, incredibly powerful state, sending its trade mission to china, controlling creeks, lands along the croatian coast, controlling my inspiring to the italian and land. how did they do it? to the nations of this fabulous right we can still taste today, where the liquor in her to probably the most innovative and economic system at that time. they have a particular form of contract system, which allowed. unusually if you were a person willing to take on risk. even if you didn't have capital, you could share in a deal with the partner who did have capital: a trading nation in the guy who didn't have capital, but he raced his life took a share of the profits. this really was the reason you have this huge market title vicar and
. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's one thing for certain, taxes on top earners are going up. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had thi
company held. they been thought through the rest of europe. and as they fought through europe, the next place they were at was a place called brett. there was a coastal fort, a major port. allies needed to resupply their forces. they needed a harbor. the only problem was there was another gun position. and like pointe du hoc, it was a suicide mission. something called the locust battery. the locust battery had massive battleship sized guns that were buried mostly the entire fortress buried underground. picture a four-story building, fortress, that had been buried underground. there were elevators going down this thing. .. >> the men described to me how the shells came over like freight trains. the shells could destroy an spire hedge row, a small mound of earth, and bury men alive. and that's exactly what happened. they fought for several weeks many this place -- in this place x then what's amazing is a small team of four men led by lieutenant bob evland, they were known as the fabulous father. the fabulous four found a bunker and a small path that had been worn out. it looked like it ha
are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> one of the first and most important thing inability or reduced ability to divide one's ability. >> it's less debilitating than alcohol. canadian study shows those driving within three hours of smoking pot are twice as likely to cause a crash. >> another affect that we see are those driving under marijuana reduced ability to perceive time and distance. >> how much is too much? >> i feel we are in unchartered territory. >> the limit is five nanograms per blood sample. impairment is equal to alcohol. >> heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> to say that two hits or two dosals would get me 5 nangram, it is impossible to make that. >> the compound in pot is thc, and it's stored in fat. user could test positive weeks after smoking. bottom line this is going to be argued and litigated. in alcohol we started at is 1.5 and game down
collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreement i had back in 2003 over the iraq war. france was against us going to war and we were against franc
and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and things like that the war in europe and united states began preparing. we have our military buildup it would increase 20% 27 million jobs right now. it turns out there wasn't enough spending in the economy they could and should have been spending more on the government and thanks to the method it's the same thing right now. there is overwhelming contribution that this is the time having the government spend more would be freed, putting people to work with the unemployed that would be basically doing nothing and essentially it is very easy and very hard politically because it is hard to persuade people about the need to do that which is why some of us books. [laughter] >> some of those would argue it's like a sugar pill for the transient work of time and then you fell back. i think it's a very interesting story. why did little more to, why didn't we strike back in the depression? in fact there was montgomery ward was a major kept waiting for the depression to comeback basically lost their position in the marketplace. it
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 149 (some duplicates have been removed)